health

Fullfacts.org Fast to Claim “5G Not Dangerous to Health” in Light of Attack on Celltowers

One strange article by “fullfacts.org” claims to explain why 5G is supposedly not dangerous to health. The article can be found here: https://fullfact.org/health/5G-not-accelerating-coronavirus/

What a level of “research” these guys out there plaster all over the internet. Let me explain why.The article’s headline matter-of-factly reads:

“5G is not accelerating the spread of the new coronavirus”,

and the text following under it refers to an article in the “Daily Star”. They go on trying to explain what cellular networks and mobile communications technologies do, how wonderful they are, and how useful an ever faster network and an ever higher bandwidth will be. The UK government adds to this mis-information, falsely claiming that the biophysical processes were well understood. They are far from being understood. If research was frozen at today’s level, we would live under the impression that the Earth is a dish and you can fall off at the edge. In fact, new studies into cell-signalling and other of those biophysical matters do increasingly discover fascinating new facts all the time, which the UK government is either ignorant of or lies about. All the industry-funded as well as official statements do not discuss how 2G, 3G and 4G networks are already under attack for damaging the immune system and causing all kinds of resulting illnesses and health problems. The Daily Star still tries to whitewash 5G technology and continues about 5G:

“5G uses a higher frequency of radio waves compared to its older generations. The frequency of this new wireless technology remains very low…”

So 5G has a “very low frequency“? They obviously do not even know the difference between frequency and energy or field strength, but they’re giving us advice…

What’s the matter with these losers trying to “educate” you out there about things they very obviously don’t know the first thing about: the entire point of a future 5G network is its ability of carrying higher payloads and, therefore, offering more bandwidth for our oh-so important Youtube-rubbish to be watched on tiny screens of dumb-people’s “smart” devices while riding the tube! This higher bandwidth is made possible by 5G’s proposed extremely high frequency (“millimeter band”, meaning future frequencies of between 22 GHz to 100 GHz which means wavelengths as short as down to 1 millimeter, hence the name). Present-day frequencies are between 900 MHz and 2.4 GHz for cell networks — and up to 5.4 GHz for some domestic and very unhealthy WiFi some naive users expose themselves and their neighbours to in their homes. So, clearly, 5G is not lower but HIGHER frequency than anything civil-level users have ever seen.

They make another point in an attempt to reassure you, stating:

“As mentioned above, the level of radiation from 5G is far below levels of electromagnetic radiation thought to cause damage to cells in the human body.”

“Thought to cause” is not the same a “it does not cause”. And these thoughts are always quoted by people who want to think that something is “safe” so they can sell it and profit from it — no matter i it may or may not make others sick. They prove nothing, as they are only thoughts which is a subjective belief that it should not be so dangerous. Had they discovered the numerous published studies finding that electro-magnetic fields or EMFs do, indeed, caus stress at the cell level, impact cell-to-cell communication at many vital points in the human body or, indeed, any living organism which also includes animals and plants, then they simply would not think so, and the previously criticized opinion is, all of a sudden, true after all.

So, in fact, nothing debunked here about the dangers of 5G nor 5G’s accelerating the spread of coronavirus — because it does, only maybe not by sending some strange signals to the viruses but by weakening the organisms of humans under attack from the virus and making them more vulnerable to the coronavirus. Still, that’s “acceleration” of the increase in numbers of people falling ill.

5G’s extremely high proposed frequencies are similar to aviation radar. (And, hey, there are known and compensated-for occupational illnesses out there that affect radar workers. So everything “quite safe”, eh?)
So “fullfact.org” is full-fail, and certainly not suitable for “debunking” anything. Also, they didn’t tell us who paid them for this ignorant write-up attempt (but I good a pretty good idea who)…
“and includes a statement by the UK government to say there is “no convincing evidence that 5G is dangerous”.
There being “no convincing evidence” means that even the UK government has to admit that there is at least some evidence then, only that it chooses to consider that “not convincing” — for whatever undisclosed political reason that may be.

earlier on Facebook:

and you @Adam Charles do believe the BBC, that’s is quite telling. Just the kind of “facts” we need :))

FYI, it is true that 5G (as well as any other type of cellular network including 2G, 3G and 4G) is spectacularly upsetting for the human immune system (and animals) due to pulsed microwave radiation damaging cell-level communication in the gut, even if it’s “non-ionising” — this is an increasingly researched and reported fact that even the WHO is starting to catch on to lately.

So don’t be too surprised that some ppl overdo it just a little bit when they are stressed out by situations like the current one they — partly unjustifiably — associate with the current problem.

I agree with you that torching the towers will not be very helpful, particularly when one’s supposed to stay home. Don’t be too surprised though if these incidents repeat afterwards: when the industry and government doesn’t listen then they have to “feel” instead.

Switzerland and Slovenia are banning or putting on hold any 5G deployment, so there’s no need for ppl to beat them to it in these countries — it’s such a better approach, won’t you say?

The 5 Best Ways to Earn Income from Your Web Content — Part 1

When you have a website, create videos on Youtube, write books or post great photographs you automatically have some kind of content that people likely want to see. In order to put whatever type of content you have to use in order to earn money off the internet, you need to find or know about at least one of the ways of content monetization listed below.

So let’s get fight into it and list the five best ways there are to put your web content to use.

Write Blog Posts People Want to Read

As much of today’s Web and all the rage around it historically has developed from Web Logs, “Blogs” or what’s nowadays called blogging, it seems like a good idea to put this method here first.

Blog post publication or blogging is also the easiest way to start content production because it is the one requiring the least amount of (and investment in) equipment. A computer able to fire up a web browser will do, and it would be unlikely to assume that anyone today — especially among readers having found this post here — would not have that.

Your blog posts can be about any topic, but will of course be about something you care and are knowledgeable about. Literally, from hamster breeding, to model railroading or mountain biking or traveling exotic destinations — these blog posts can be any of these, and a lot more. It’s important that they are worthwhile for your  readers, have bit-sized length and hopefully are structured in a way people can easily access and navigate your content as well as follow your train of thought.

To make these blog-post based types of content usable for monetization, you will need to add in links to things that you or others are selling. These can be anything from your own stuff, membership websites, books you’re trying to sell, dog-walking services you offer or anything in between, or it could be anything for sale at third-party websites which you are an affiliate for so you receive a commission in case visitors that can be tracked back to you and your website buy something off them. Common examples would be links like this one https://www.shutterstock.com/g/marquixHD?rid=2853577&utm_medium=email&utm_source=ctrbreferral-link directing your visitors to images for sale on the Shutterstock website, or one that promotes a book available from Amazon for which the affiliate link could look like this https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1717228585/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=mm-com-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1717228585&linkId=754af4ec68db653e8062d7d5501aa7d1.

Beautify Links and Add Extra Features

Now, in order to make these links look better (particularly than the first one that’s got a long and ugly tail that includes all kinds of settings as well as the referral or affiliate ID), you may want to work on them a little more. One way would be using shortlink generators like tinyurl.com or bit.ly. Another one would be using Amazon’s own shortlink generator that compresses their very long ones into something like https://amzn.to/2UUH5bg for better usability.

An even better way though would be using your own link list that redirects visitors to whatever target you desire with a link on your own website’s domain name, looking something like this http://marquix.net/try/webtalk-marquix-hd/

On top of being more visually pleasing, links of the latter type also provide insigths for you into how often they have been visited or clicked upon. This is a feature you normally only get from paid-for redirect or shortlink services like bit.ly. The most important feature of these beautified re-directs is the ability to easily manage or update these links though. Imagine that the seller you link to changes their link structure or that some item is no longer available and/or replaced by a newer model with a new stock-keeping-unit or SKU number, you normally would have to search the Web for all your old affiliate links in order to update them if you want them to continue working and bring you income. A unified location, on your own website and under your own control at that, would allow you to simply change that forwarding link in one place just once, for all your many instances of these affiliate mentions to automatically be updated and point to the new target URL.

A great example for achieving this would be running your website on WordPress or any other content management system that allows the use of Plugins (specialized modules, often made by third parties developing for Joomla, Magento, WordPress or even centrally-hosted platforms like Shopify and others) that take care of these very functions and extra features. A useful one that I can honestly recommend for this purpose would be Easy Affiliate Links for WordPress. This is a FREE plugin for WordPress that I like (and I don’t receive any commissions for but I simply want to share here)! Give this one a try so you know what we are talking about when it comes to content monetization.

Also do note that the consdierations for blog posts and text content of this kind are applicable to the other types of content, from videos, to books and web or e-learning courses as well. These other content types will be talked about in the upcoming segments of this series (to be published soon — subscribe to my mailing list for notifications or come back and check this space manually).