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Video Marketing: Top 6 Reasons It Is Essential

There are statistics and numbers left, right and centre showing that video marketing is much more effective than marketing without video. These are pretty convincing for some time now, and they just sound right. It is amazing, though, how many online “marketers” still haven’t heard about it, or still haven’t really got the message in that they still don’t know how to apply video (properly).

Initially, let us look into the major facts making video marketing such an effective selling tool. I discovered the following list of pretty straight-forward top-6 facts here plus the additional list further down to the bottom, both hammering home the basic idea and making you get the message right away:

  • Companies from A like Apple to Z like Zappos, the online shoe retailer, use video extensively; Zappos, for example, makes product demo videos for every one of its shoes, and their video team produces more than 2300 videos per week
  • Why? Because, according to another set of Zappos data, the company’s conversion rate grew by between 6% and 30% for items that included product demos. In addition, site visitors who viewed a video prior to buying a shoe were 52% less likely to return it
  • Stacks & Stacks, the online kitchenware sellers, reported shoppers to be 144% more likely to purchase from their site after watching a product video compared to those who didn’t
  • Companies and brands from Adobe to Adidas, Volkswagen to Amazon continue to shift their online marketing strategies aggressively toward online video
  • According to internet research company comScore, users share more than 700 YouTube videos using Twitter every single minute
  • You will be using video in the marketing effort for your business — not because it seems “cool” but because your audience is demanding it

It’s pretty obvious that marketing for your business can’t afford to ignore online video marketing. So, why video?

  • Search for video on YouTube is serving as the second largest internet search engine
  • YouTube scores an overall third among the most visited websites in the world
  • Video shows up on page one of current “number one” popular search engine Google
  • A single video is worth 1.8 Million words
  • According to comScore, 45.4% of online users view at least one video online per month
  • The average user is exposed to an average of 32.2 videos in a month
  • Over 100 Million people watch online video every day
  • According to comScore, viewers spend 16 minutes and 49 seconds per month on average watching video ads
  • The average website visit without video is 50 seconds
  • The average website visit with video is over 5 minutes
  • 73% of sellers say they would promote their listings with someone using video to market their item
  • An Australian marketing group reports that real estate listings with videos receive 403% more inquiries than those without videos.

Top Five Tips for Marketing with Video

It is not a secret that Video is one of the best tools there is for both internet and traditional marketing campaigns. Video is quickly gaining popularity among businesses. Statistics show significantly higher levels of visitor engagement, significant increases in conversion rates, and improved search engine optimisation results when video is used in marketing activities.

Companies both large and small have a huge need for quality content. Content was king since the very beginning of commercial internet use, now it’s not “just content” anymore but Video Is King, meaning that content with related video scores the highest.

A well-produced video can be just the thing to catch the attention of your website visitors or prospective customers in a brick-and-mortar setting .

The following five tips explain how to use video to improve SEO for internet selling and draw in more customers both online and off:

1. Pre-Production: Draft an actionable plan containing a list of reasonable and achievable goals for your video before you start shooting it. When working with a pro, ask them to incorporate these marketing goals at the pre-production stage and shoot in accordance with them. Time is money (for both yourselves and your video producer), and this greatly saves on unnecessary footage before it is even produced. Targeted content with a solid call-to-action does the trick. You want to take viewers to the next step of the sales funnel.

2. Create high-quality videos: not necessarily hiring a big-time production firm (expensive), but have your video shot with a few simple techniques in mind in order to not have it bounce (viewers leaving after a few seconds, bad for SEO rankings) and, that way, do more harm than good. Only start after solid pre-production (your own goals written down, properly transferred to video pro’s shooting plan), avoid long-windedness and slow-moving storylines. Make sure that state-of-the-art equipment is used (you want a production pro knowing their job, using the right lighting and other equipment to come up with well-produced HD video footage to be made into a brief clip, ideally less than one minute in total length.

3. Host your videos on your own domain: while YouTube or Vimeo and similar hosting sites may seem convenient for hosting videos, they will not let you have the benefit of increased web traffic to your own website. To tap into YouTube’s high visitor traffic, consider having your video pro extract an introductory video and post this with a brief text description and a link to the full video on your own domain (or have your video or marketing specialist do it for you). This will increase your visibility and drive visitors to your own site, and that’s where you want them to be (not YouTube)! On top, include share buttons for your videos, blog posts, and other content to give others the opportunity to amplify your reach.

4. Optimise your videos by adding meta descriptions: search engines cannot see but need to get an accurate picture of what’s in your video. Be sure to only use terms of what is actually in your video to avoid viewers quickly moving on (counted as bounces and damaging your rankings).

5. Use social media to get more traction from your video by distributing it across social media channels: when the above is done, don’t stop here but get more bang for the buck by also posting the video on all of your social media sites for your audience to re-share and enjoy.

We can help you to effectively use video marketing for both your online or traditional business and increase website traffic and customer conversion rates. Our business-friendly priced packages cost significantly less than the benefit they provide. Check out our video production services or get in touch with us for a free quote.

Race to the Bottom

It’s not a secret that the online stock or “microsotck” business model is rapidly wearing out itself. This appears to be true for both buyers and sellers of downloadable arts files. The best part is the one of the agencies themselves where big automated profits can be made off however small a margin because of multiplication made possible by an intelligent business system. Even for the agencies themselves, things aren’t as rosy as they used to be though. It all burns down to the vast number of files stored in today’s agencies. With 60 million images on Shutterstock alone, you should get the picture — or not, because how on earth are buyers supposed to find something within a reasonable amount of time?

Particularly with the surge in video footage made available (and stored) online, all aspects have turned red exponentially: cost of storage, use of bandwidth on the part of the agencies, time needed to sift through the enormous amounts of content available on part of the prospective buyer, and lowered prices and profit margins mostly on the part of artists (but partially agencies themselves as well).

So even the agencies themselves increasingly appear to be hurting. Even iStock as a subsidiary of media giant Getty Images, is spinning non-stop and throwing out increasingly desperate changes to their pricing and overall business model. Mergers and acquisitions — most recently the one between Fotolia and Adobe — prove that cost-cutting is more than just the latest flavour of the day.

Further illustrating the problem is the fact that $1-or-below pictures and $2 video clips cannot possibly be very profitable for anyone, artist or agency alike. Saying just that, the banner below — while clickable for a commission sponsoring this site much more attractively than actual images themselves — is truly symbolic for the overall situation described.

video hive is an example for online video footage selling from only $2.00

In a world like that, truly new approaches are urgently needed. One could be reverse image search or “human-powered image discovery” as seen with ImageBrief. Others may be self-hosting and taking back control of one’s own content and intellectual property on individually-owned gallery websites and quality showcase locations online. Additional business models will — and have to — be developed, including the incorporation of disruptive technologies like Bitcoin and other Crypto currencies with a potential to solve crucial parts (like cost of payments transmission and general micropayments distribution) of the microstock business model.

The near future will be exciting, and we will be watching and reporting on things to come.

 

Multicopter or “Drone”?

There is a common misconception in this day in age that all multirotor, RC, or FPV aircraft are “drones” just because they carry a camera or other such payload. when the the truth is, these aircraft have no self-guidance, waypoints or spying capabilities. Today’s media reports on these aircraft like they are spying drones and deadly weapons, when really, they are no more than flying cameras.

The problem and misnomer is similar to the term “hacker”: the reality — and true meaning of the word — is someone who has a passionate interest in computing and programs (“hacks”) on their own computer’s keyboard to solve problems and advance technology for the love of what you can do with it, but the mass media have obscured this original meaning and effectively re-defined the term as if it referred to an attacker or someone who cracks (breaks into) computer systems of someone else.

My advice to you is to not pay attention to the “drone” title multirotor aircraft have received in the recent years. To find out, you might want to purchase an inexpensive small multirotor and find out for yourself. The blade NQX would be your best bet for a starter multirotor.

It all depends on what kind of setup you are looking for. Horizon does do multirotors — a Blade quadcopter is a multirotor, however the manufacturer Horizon brands them as drones in order to keep up with market competition, and to appeal to a different kind of customer. Horizon is a great company: they would normally call this a quadcopter, whereas a company such as DJI would not.

 

Stock Photography: An Art, a Craft, a Technology, or a Business?

One of the frequently asked questions around Photography and Stock Photography in particular is, whether someone working in this field is an artist, a craftsperson, a technolgist, or a business owner. For arguments sake, let us pretend that we do not know that tax authorities believe this is a commercial endeavour, hence a “business”, and let us approach the question without the bias of tax laws.

Stock photography, let alone photography in general, is very much at home in the Arts field. It is quite evident that without some artsy approach, there is little chance of producing good and salesworthy results. Even for repro, infrared, or engineering photography, one might argue that there is still some degree of an “artistic eye” necessary.

Equally many ingredients in stock photography are derived from the crafts area: not only is your camera and other equipment a tool, but lighting, creating a set, and shooting a technically usable photo are undoubtedly what a craftsperson does.

In the day and age of photography as well as video production going increasingly digital, technology aspects are getting increasingly important in all these fields. Even in the age of film, there were lots of technical aspects to keep in mind, from film speed to mixing the right baths in the darkroom to using the correct set of brushes and scissors if you happened to be retouching. Little can you do as an aspiring photographer today, if you don’t know about computer storage media, USB standards, computer file systems on one hand or ISO settings or sensor noise, and many more — ideally on a sound basis of “old-style” knowledge, above –, on the other in order to make good use of these aspects and produce results that have all the features you want to influence using these aspects and settings.

The business aspect: it is present in everything you do as a photographer, particularly as a stock photographer where you primarily want to sell your work, and to the maximum number of prospective buyers at that. In order to succeed with that part, a thorough understanding of both artistic trends as well as marketing, particularly internet and social media marketing, are essential.

So, in summary, Stock Photography is All of the Above. Working as a stock photographer includes myriad ingredients from Arts, Crafts, Technology, and Business aspects.

Depending on the scale ow one’s own stock photography endeavours, one or the other may have a bigger share in the overall equation. From renting significant floor space in a business park to pursuing a micro-scale commercial and object photography business literally from the kitchen table, everything is included in the broader meaning of Stock Photograph — and don’t forget, the cost-reward-ratios can even be a lot better for smaller-scale operators. It all depends on one’s personal style and also on finding a niche and how to work it, from Yuri Arcurs Photography, Aarhus, Denmark or Joshua Hodge right down to the little guy.